HEALING
THROUGH DISCOVERY

Meeting regional healthcare needs, exceeding our own expectations

A BEACON FOR BEST MEDICAL PRACTICES AND BREAKTHROUGH RESEARCH

By operating the largest hospital in Suffolk County and the top teaching hospital in the region, we assume a major responsibility. We dedicate ourselves to providing accessible, affordable and high quality clinical care to the residents of Long Island. We commit ourselves to applied medical research and discovery that will generate new treatments and technologies. And we engage ourselves as educators for the next generation of medical professionals.

Through these efforts, we position Stony Brook as a leader in medical practice and research. And the metric of our success, with each breakthrough and each treatment, is the health of our community.

$420M

Medical and Research Translation (MART) building broke ground in 2014

100

doctors trained at Stony Brook Hospital annually

300

nurses trained at Stony Brook Hospital annually

only

children’s hospital in the state’s second largest county (Suffolk)

PRIORITY INITIATIVES

PIONEERING THE NEXT GENERATION OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

Pioneering the next generation of Biomedical Imaging technology

The recent endowment of a new Biomedical Imaging chair reflects Stony Brook’s commitment to leadership not just in the fields of research that benefit from biomedical imaging — including cardiovascular, neuroscience and cancer research — but in the technology that creates it.

PROVIDING LONG ISLAND CHILDREN THE BEST POSSIBLE CARE

Providing Long Island children the best possible care

Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, Suffolk County’s only children’s hospital, is recognized for its pediatric emergency room, renowned neo-natal intensive care unit and one of the country’s top ranked pediatric nephrology units. With a new faculty, we can treat more kids, expand research efforts and train more of tomorrow’s pediatric specialists.

Priority needs and other opportunities for giving to the Stony Brook Children’s Hospital can be found here.

“Philanthropy makes the world go round. We like to lead by example, and the hope is that other alumni and people in the community will feel the same way. Without funding, these (projects) are not going to get done and the world would be a very different place.” Jane Knapp ’78, former president of the Stony Brook Alumni Association

ASSUMING A LEADERSHIP ROLE IN CANCER RESEARCH AND CARE

Assuming a leadership role in cancer research and care

Stony Brook Medicine has already received top recognition from the Commission on Cancer and the American College of Surgeons. But by adding additional research and treatment capacity, we aim to earn a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center designation, truly bringing the greatest hope and the highest quality care to the region’s cancer patients.

ENHANCING STONY BROOK'S MEDICAL RESEARCH CAPACITY

Enhancing Stony Brook’s medical research capacity

Medical discovery and innovation at Stony Brook have already improved the lives of patients around the world. We will build on this strong foundation by hiring 30 new basic and translational science faculty, equipping laboratory space, supporting postdoctoral researchers and investing in start-up research.

IMPROVING PATIENT OUTCOMES THROUGH DATA ANALYSIS

Improving patient outcomes through data analysis

The intersection of applied mathematics, computer science and medicine is providing fertile ground for developing new therapies, making evidence-based treatment decisions, and tracking and improving patient outcomes. A new Department of Biomedical Informatics will establish Stony Brook as a leader in this vibrant field.

STONY BROOK STORIES

Stony Brook, NY; Stony Brook University Hospital:(5/1/17) Six-month-old triplets Hunter, Jackson and Kaden, (two identical and one fraternal) all born with a rare skull condition known as craniosynostosis, made their first public appearance with their parents Michael and Amy Howard as well as the doctors David A. Chesler, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery and Pediatrics and Elliot Duboys, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital who performed what is believed to be the first-ever reported surgery on triplets with craniosynostosis.

Stony Brook Medicine performs first-ever procedure on triplets with rare skull condition

Stony Brook doctors recently corrected a rare skull condition in triplets that had, until now, never been reported in medical literature. Prognosis: Perfect.

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Groundbreaking Cancer Research

Most cancer drugs are designed to target dividing cells, but a new study by Stony Brook University researchers published in the journal Developmental Cell suggests that targeting invasive cells may be a new strategy to treat metastatic cancer. This is the first study to definitively show the dichotomy between cell division and cell invasion.

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cancer-research
(c)2012 Sam Levitan Photography

Internationally Recognized Program at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital Helps Patients Adjust to School

For those battling cancer or blood disorders, every day can be a struggle. Between rigorous treatments, therapy sessions and schedule changes to accommodate appointments, it can be overwhelming. But when these people happen to be students as well, life suddenly becomes even more difficult.

That’s why Stony Brook Children’s Hospital has an internationally recognized School Intervention and Re-Entry Program, which is free for patients and composed of doctors, nurses and child life specialists.

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Cancer Researchers Receive Damon Runyon Innovation Award

Hallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled division of cancer cells and invasive behavior that leads to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. But Stony Brook cell biologists David Matus, PhD and Benjamin Martin, PhD discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors.

This new knowledge — for which they won the Damon Runyon Innovation award — could have a significant impact on the future design of therapeutics to eradicate invasive cells that traditional chemotherapy does not target.

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Cancer Research - sized

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